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Camilo Mora
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
Halifax, NS, Canada
Phone: 902-494-2146
Email: cmora@dal.ca

Ransom A. Myers
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
Halifax, NS, Canada
Deceased

Marta Coll
Institut de Ciènces del Mar, ICM-CSIC, Passeig Marítim de la Barceloneta
Barcelona, Spain
Phone: 902-494-3406
Email: martacoll@dal.ca

Simone Libralato
Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale - OGS
Dept. Oceanography, ECHO Group
Borgo Grotta Gigante - Brisciki 42/c - 34010 Sgonico - Zgonik (TS) Italy
Phone: +39 040 2140376
Email: slibralato@ogs.trieste.it

Tony J. Pitcher
Fisheries Ecosystems Restoration Research
Fisheries Centre, Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada
Phone: 1 604 822
Email: pitcher.t@gmail.com

Rashid U. Sumaila
Sea Around Us Project
Fisheries Centre
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, V6T 1Z4, Canada
Phone: 604-822-0224
Email: r.sumaila@fisheries.ubc.ca

Dirk Zeller
Sea Around Us Project
Fisheries Centre
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, V6T 1Z4, Canada
Phone: 1-604-822-1950
Email: d.zeller@fisheries.ubc.ca

Reg Watson
Sea Around Us Project
Fisheries Centre
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, V6T 1Z4, Canada
Phone: 1-604-822-1950
Email: r.watson@fisheries.ubc.ca

Kevin J. Gaston
Department of Animal and Plant Sciences
University of Sheffield
Alfred Denny Building
Western Bank
Sheffield S10 2TN
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0)114 222 0030
Email: k.j.gaston@sheffield.ac.uk

Boris Worm
Department of Biology
Dalhousie University
Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
Phone: 1-902-494-2478
Email: bworm@dal.ca

Contacts for External Comments:

Carl Safina, PhD (President)
Blue Ocean Institute
School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
Stony Brook University
www.blueocean.org
www.carlsafina.org
Phone: (516) 922-9500 or (631) 838-8368
Email: csafina@blueocean.org

Andrew A. Rosenberg, Ph.D.
Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space
Morse Hall 142
University of New Hampshire
Phone: 603-862-2020
Email: Andy.Rosenberg@unh.edu


The materials provided in this page can be use by the press for news associated with the Mora et al. PLoS Biology paper, as long as the credits for the sources, which appear below each video or photo, are given.

High quality versions of the videos are available to download below.

If you experience problems with these files please contact Camilo Mora at cmora@dal.ca


Management of the World's Fisheries
General description of the study. Footage courtesy of GreenPeace, Fabio De Leo, SkyTruth, SharkWater, SeaWeb and Findlay Muir.
HIGH QUALITY VERSION
(right click and select 'Save Target As...')


Average effectiveness of the world's fisheries management
This clip features the results of the study. Animation by Camilo Mora.
HIGH QUALITY VERSION
(right click and select 'Save Target As...')
B-Roll
This clip features the b-roll that is available for use of the press with news associated with this paper.
HIGH QUALITY VERSION
(right click and select 'Save Target As...')


The materials provided in this page can be use by the press for news associated with the Mora et al. PLoS Biology paper, as long as the credits for the sources, which appear below each video or photo, are given.

High-resolution images are available by clicking on the images.

Effectiveness of the world's fisheries management regimes. This map shows the average scores each country received for the scientific robustness of its fisheries recommendations, transparency in converting scientific recommendations into policy, capability to enforce regulations and the extent of subsidies, fishing effort and foreign fishing. See paper for details.
Average Management Effectiveness
Bluefin tuna fishing. One of the world's most profitable species is currently at the brink of a collapse due to high demand from oriental cuisine and poor regulation policies that allow high fishing quotas largely exceeding the recommendations by scientists.
Bluefin Tuna. ©Greenpeace-Gavin Newman
Tsukiji fish market. Credit to SBA73-Flickr Creative Commons license
A dead bluefin tuna underwater. ©Greenpeace-Marco Care
Trans-ships tuna South Atlantic. ©Greenpeace-Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert
Yellow Fin Tuna for export. ©Greenpeace-Natalie Behring-Chisholm
Shark fishing. Many of these top predators are currently recognized as being highly threatened by extinction due to intended and incidental catches to supply the high global demand for shark fins, an Asian delicacy. The generation and enforcement of regulations within this industry remain precarious worldwide.
Sharks. Credit to BritsinCancun-Flickr Creative Commons license
Shark fins. Credit to Patrick Darden-Flickr Creative Commons license
Shark Fishing. Credit to Marcia Moreno MarinePhotobank
Shark Fin Soup. Credit to Chee Hong - Fickr Creative Commons license
By-catch: Capture of non-intended species. Due to the non-selectivity of certain fishing operations, many unintended species are often capture and returned dead or dying to the ocean. Globally, by-catch is estimated at about 30% of the fisheries catch and although devices to reduce it already exist their implementation is highly variable among countries.
Bycatched GrayWhale. Credit to Bob Talbot 1986/Marine Photobank the LegaSea Project.
Bycatched turtle. Credit to NOAANMFS/Marine Photobank
Typical by-catch. Credit to Stephen McGowan Australian Marine College 2006/Marine Photobank.
Typical by-catch. Credit to Stephen McGowan/MarinePhotobank
Overcapacity or increase in fishing effort. Open access to fishing leads to a "race for fish" that commonly increases fleet size and fishing power. Regulation of this activity has resulted in the decommissioning of boats that often end up fishing in developing nations, or in the modernization of the remaining boats. According to the FAO, in 2004 the world's fishing fleet consisted of 4 million vessels.
Illegal fishing by decommissioned boats. ©Greenpeace-Brent Balalas
Overcapacity. Credit to Wolcott Henry/Marine Photobank.
Overcapacity. Credit to Wolcott Henry/Marine Photobank.
Ecosystem effects of overfishing: jellyfish blooms. Recent explosions in the populations of these gelatinous organisms have been attributed in part to ecosystem disorganization due to overfishing.
Jellyfish Blooms. Credit to Shawn Rener.
Ecosystem effects of overfishing: historical reduction in fish body size. Due to the tendency for capturing large animals, several wild populations of fish have experienced reductions in their body size. This change is also accompanied with early sexual maturation and reduced production of smaller eggs, which may impair populations' resilience to stressors.
1950s halibut sizes. Credit to Stu Spivack/Flickr Creative Commons license.
Contemporary halibut sizes. Credit to JP Everet/Flickr Creative Commons license
Commercial fishing methods: purse seines. One of the most revolutionary large-scale fishing methods. The decline of many fisheries stocks has been linked to the appearance of these and similar commercial fishing operations.
Purse seiner. Credit to Wolcott Henry/Marine Photobank.
Commercial fishing methods: bottom trawling. A fishing method, in which a fishing net is dragged on the sea floor to capture different benthic organisms. Unfortunately, the method has a high level of by-catch and it is particularly destructive of benthic habitats.
Satellite image of Bottom Trawling. Credit to USGS/MarinePhotobank.
Varied photos.
Reproductive aggregation of fish. Credit to Fernando Zapata.
Fish diversity. Courtesy of J.E.N. Veron Coral Reef of the World.
Fishing net. Credit to Sarah Lelong/MarinePhotobank.
Catch fish. Credit to Sascha Regmann-Project Blue Sea/Marine_Photobank
Skipjack Tuna at Fish Market ©Greenpeace-Paul Hilton.

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Please select the format in which you wish to view the results. The Google Earth version requires a plugin to be installed, after the initial install of the plugin the data will load quicker in the Google Earth version.

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Last Updated: 2010-07-01